Typhoon Angela

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The 1989 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1989, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November.[1] These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1989 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names.

Storms

35 tropical cyclones formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 31 became tropical storms. 21 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 6 reached super typhoon strength.

Typhoon Brenda

Template:Infobox hurricane small A tropical depression which formed in the monsoon trough on May 14 became a tropical storm on the 16th and crossed the Philippines that day. Brenda became a typhoon and reached a peak of 85 mph winds before hitting southern China on the 20th. The storm brought torrential flooding, resulting in at least 140 casualties and widespread damage.[2]

Typhoon Cecil

Template:Infobox hurricane small The day after Brenda dissipated another tropical depression formed in the South China Sea from the monsoon trough. It became a tropical storm later on the 22nd, and reached typhoon strength on the 24th. Cecil initially tracked to the northwest, but ridging to the north forced the typhoon westward where it hit central Vietnam on the 24th. Cecil rapidly dissipated, but not after bringing heavy flooding that killed 52 and left over 100,000 homeless.[3]

Typhoon Dot

Template:Infobox hurricane small Forming south of the central Caroline Islands, Dot moved steadily west-northwest across the Philippines through the South China Sea across southern Hainan island into northern Vietnam.[4]

Tropical Storm Ellis

Template:Infobox hurricane small Developing as a disturbance in the Philippine Sea on June 18, the system moved westward initially and became a tropical depression late on June 20 and weakened on June 21. Early on June 23, the large system with gales well removed from its center became a tropical depression once more. A trough to its northwest had deepened, which was accelerating the cyclone northward. It became a minimal tropical storm during this accleration. Late that day, it became a frontal wave before moving through Japan into the Sea of Japan.[5]

Super Typhoon Gordon/Goring

Template:Infobox hurricane small A single Cumulonimbus cloud beneath the Tropical Upper Tropospheric Trough developed into a weak tropical depression on July 9. It tracked westward with a cold core upper level low aloft, a very unusual circumstance. Initially forecasted to remain weak due to the lack of upper level outflow, it was able to strengthen into a tropical storm on the 12th. The cold low quickly warmed, and Gordon became a typhoon on the 13th. It rapidly intensified on the 14th and 15th to a 160 mph super typhoon, and hit northern Luzon later that day at that intensity. It steadily weakened as hit moved westward, and made landfall on southern China, 100 miles southwest of Hong Kong, as a 70 mph tropical storm on the 18th. Gordon caused 97 casualties[6] and left 120,000 homeless.[7]

Tropical Storm Irving

Template:Infobox hurricane small 65 mph Tropical Storm Irving hit northern Vietnam on July 24, killing 102 from heavy flooding.[8]

Tropical Storm Ken-Lola

Template:Infobox hurricane small The monsoon trough spawned a tropical depression on July 29. Poorly organized, it moved quickly northeastward and became a tropical storm on the 30th. Operationally, Tropical Storm Ken continued northeastward with the rest of the convection, with Tropical Storm Lola forming further westward, but the ill-defined circulation actually continued westward, leading to one storm with two names. Ken-Lola turned to the southwest, stalling before heading northwest again. Ken-Lola reached a peak of 60 mph winds before hitting eastern China on the 3rd, causing little damage as it slowly dissipated until the 7th.[9] Ken-Lola shows the troubles of tracking poorly organized systems. A more recent example is Tropical Depression 32W/33W in 1995.

Typhoon Mac

Template:Infobox hurricane small Moving around the northeast side of Ken-Lola, and then an upper tropospheric cyclone Mac moved along a wide northwest arc before settling on a north-northwest track into Japan as a typhoon on August 6, dissipating over Sakhalin Island on August 8.[10]

Typhoon Sarah

Template:Infobox hurricane small On September 9, Typhoon Sarah, which formed on the 3rd, stalled east of the Philippines, bringing heavy rain and rare tornadic activity to the country. Sarah turned northward, where it rapidly intensified to a 145 mph typhoon on the 11th. The system had 2 main centers, causing it to loop while south of Taiwan before crossing the island on the 12th. Sarah continued northwestward, and dissipated over eastern China on the 14th. 44 casualties can be attributed to this system.[11]

Tropical Storm Tip

Template:Infobox hurricane small Tip formed along the eastern portion of the monsoon trough, and tracked northeast until the subtropical ridge blocked its motion in that direction. Rounding the western periphery of the ridge, Tip eventually recurved well offshore Japan and became an extratropical cyclone.[12]

Tropical Storm Vera

Template:Infobox hurricane small Tropical Storm Vera, which formed on September 11, hit eastern China on the 15th as a 45 mph storm. Torrential rains and flooding caused more than 500 casualties and extensive crop damage.[13]

Super Typhoon Angela

Template:Infobox hurricane small When the small Super Typhoon Angela, which developed on September 28, hit northern Luzon on October 5, it caused 62 fatalities (with 50 missing) and massive damage from flooding and mudslides. Over the next 12 days, the Philippines would be hit by 2 more typhoons; Dan and Elsie.[14]

Typhoon Brian

Template:Infobox hurricane small [15]

Typhoon Colleen

Template:Infobox hurricane small [16]

Typhoon Dan

Template:Infobox hurricane small The 2nd of 3 typhoons to hit the Philippines in a 12 day period, Dan hit the central part of the country on October 10 as a 75 mph typhoon. It continued westward to hit Vietnam on the 13th where it dissipated. Dan, though a weak system, killed 41 people as it crossed the archipelago and left 232,555 people homeless.[17]

Super Typhoon Elsie

Template:Infobox hurricane small 17 casualties can be attributed to Super Typhoon Elsie hitting Luzon as a 160 mph super typhoon on October 19, just weeks after Angela and Dan hit the same area.[18]

Typhoon Forrest

Template:Infobox hurricane small The last of the tropical cyclones in October and the 17th typhoon of the year, Forrest was slow to develop initially near the Marshall Islands as it was a large cyclone. Once it passed Guam by only 140 km/85 mi, it intensified into a typhoon, with maximum sustained winds peaking at 95 kt/110 mph. Tree limbs and power lines were downed as the system pulled away from Saipan. It then recurved, accelerating northeast to become of the strongest extratropical cyclones in the Pacific Ocean that year.[19]

Typhoon Gay

Template:Infobox hurricane small Template:Hurricane main Typhoon Gay was a Western Pacific typhoon that crossed the Malay Peninsula in early November. It continued westward, reaching a peak of 160 mph winds before hitting India and dissipating on the 10th. Gay killed over 1,000 people.[20]

1989 storm names

Western North Pacific tropical cyclones were named by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. The first storm of 1989 was named Winona and the final one was named Jack. Though the names Ken and Lola were used separately, they were in fact one system.

  • Andy 2W
  • Brenda 3W
  • Cecil 4W
  • Dot 5W
  • Ellis 6W
  • Faye 7W
  • Gordon 8W
  • Hope 9W
  • Irving 10W
  • Judy 11W
  • Ken 13W-14W
  • Lola 13W-14W
  • Mac 15W
  • Nancy 16W
  • Owen 17W
  • Peggy 18W
  • Roger 20W
  • Sarah 22W
  • Tip 23W
  • Vera 24W
  • Wayne 25W
  • Abby
  • Ben
  • Carmen
  • Dom
  • Ellen
  • Forrest
  • Georgia
  • Herbert
  • Ida
  • Joe
  • Kim
  • Lex
  • Marge
  • Norris
  • Orchid
  • Percy
  • Ruth
  • Sperry
  • Thelma
  • Vernon
  • Wynn
  • Alex
  • Betty
  • Cary
  • Dinah
  • Ed
  • Freda
  • Gerald
  • Holly
  • Ian
  • June
  • Kelly
  • Lynn
  • Maury
  • Nina
  • Ogden
  • Phyllis
  • Roy
  • Susan
  • Thad
  • Vanessa
  • Warren
  • Agnes
  • Bill
  • Clara
  • Doyle
  • Elsie
  • Fabian
  • Gay
  • Hal
  • Irma
  • Jeff
  • Kit
  • Lee
  • Mamie
  • Nelson
  • Odessa
  • Pat
  • Ruby
  • Skip
  • Tess
  • Val
  • Winona 1W

After List 1 ended, the following names were used, part of the following years' name listing.

  • Angela 26W
  • Brian 27W
  • Colleen 28W
  • Dan 29W
  • Elsie 30W
  • Forrest 31W
  • Gay 32W
  • Hunt 33W
  • Irma 34W
  • Jack 36W
  • Koryn
  • Lewis
  • Marian
  • Nathan
  • Ofelia
  • Percy
  • Robyn
  • Steve
  • Tasha
  • Vernon
  • Winona
  • Yancy
  • Zola

See also

References

  1. ^ Gary Padgett. May 2003 Tropical Cyclone Summary. Retrieved 2006-08-26.
  2. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Brenda. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  3. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Cecil. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  4. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Dot. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  5. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical Storm Ellis. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  6. ^ Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration. Most Destructive Tropical Cyclones for the Month of July (1948-2000). Retrieved on 2007-02-04.
  7. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Super Typhoon Gordon. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  8. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical Storm Irving. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  9. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical Storm Ken-Lola. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  10. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Mac. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  11. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Sarah. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  12. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical Storm Tip. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  13. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical Storm Vera. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  14. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Super Typhoon Angela. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  15. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Brian. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  16. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Colleen. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  17. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Dan. Retrieved on [2007-01-20]].
  18. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Super Typhoon Elsie. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  19. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Forrest. Retrieved on 2007-01-07.
  20. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Gay. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.

External links


Original Source

Original content from Wikipedia underGNU Free Documentation License. See fulldisclaimer.

  1. Gary Padgett. May 2003 Tropical Cyclone Summary. Retrieved 2006-08-26.
  2. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Brenda. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  3. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Cecil. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  4. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Dot. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  5. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical Storm Ellis. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  6. Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration. Most Destructive Tropical Cyclones for the Month of July (1948-2000). Retrieved on 2007-02-04.
  7. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Super Typhoon Gordon. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  8. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical Storm Irving. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  9. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical Storm Ken-Lola. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  10. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Mac. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  11. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Sarah. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  12. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical Storm Tip. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  13. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical Storm Vera. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  14. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Super Typhoon Angela. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  15. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Brian. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  16. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Colleen. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  17. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Dan. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  18. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Super Typhoon Elsie. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  19. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Forrest. Retrieved on 2007-01-07.
  20. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Gay. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.