Toribio Jose Cosio

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Toribio José Cosío y Campo (1665 – 29 October 1743)[1] was the Governor-General of the Philippines from 6 August 1721 to 14 August 1729.[2]

Biography

Cosío was a businessman, having engaged in commerce like his other relatives such as Juan Pérez de Cossío and Mateo González de Cossío.[3] He was granted a loader's license in 1695, and moved to Nueva España (Mexico) along with two servants.[4] He married María Ignacia de Miranda Zúñiga y Trujillo, and was inducted as a knight of the Order of Calatrava.[5] He was appointed by King Philip V as governor of Guatemala on 22 July 1704. He took office on 2 September 1706. During his term, he had to quell numerous uprisings, including that of the confederation of the Zendale people of the province of Chiapas. He was then appointed as Governor-General of the Philippines on 30 June 1720.

As Governor-General

Cosío arrived in Manila on 23 July 1721, and began his term of office on 6 August 1721.[6] He succeeded Fernándo Bustamante, who was assassinated on 11 October 1719.[7] Before his appointment, Archbishop Francisco de la Cuesta, OSH served as acting governor-general.[8]

He was tasked to reopen the investigation regarding Bustamante's administration and the circumstances that led to his and his son's assassination.[9] While he was able to investigate Bustamante's administration, he was not able to discover those who were guilty of assassinating Bustamante and his son.[10] The reason for that is because it is said that if it was done, it will lead to public unrest especially from among the members of the religious orders.[11]

He strived to comply with the regulations which were aimed to combat smuggling, the existence of illicit houses and gambling tables, the manufacture and sale of cane brandy and other prohibited beverages, and other actions which are considered as immoral.[12] He introduced the practice of governors-general appointing officials in political and military offices.[13] He corrected, expanded, and updated the Ordinances of the Royal Hospital of Manila in 1727.[14]

He made efforts to replenish the monetary resources of the colonial government, as it was discovered that it is riddled with debt.[15] He also ordered the construction of ships in Cavite. Such include the Santo Toribio y San Miguel, and the Nuestra Señora de los Dolores y San Francisco Javier.[16] He rigorously implemented the royal order of 17 October 1720 which prohibited the trade of silk between the Philippines and Nueva España.[17]

As for military actions, he organized several expeditions in Sulu and Mindanao, where were aimed at stopping the activities of Moro pirates.[18] Eventually, the peace treaty between the colonial government and the Sultanate of Sulu was revised in 1725.[19] However, Moro pirates began attacking Spanish outposts in Mindanao.[20] Soon after, the Sultanate sought peace with the colonial government.[21]

His term of office ended on 14 August 1729, and was succeeded by Fernando Valdés.[22]

After his term

Valdés organized a trial against him, after twenty-six charges were brought against him.[23] He was found guilty of only one of those charges, and was asked to pay a fine of 4,000 pesos.[24] He paid the fine, and waived any rights that might assist him in his case.[25] He left the archipelago on 31 July 1730 and arrived at Acapulco almost seven months later.[26]

He died on 29 October 1743.[27]

References

  1. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa," accessed 19 February 2021, http://dbe.rah.es/biografias/15116/toribio-jose-miguel-de-cossio-y-campa
  2. Carlos Quirino, Old Manila, ed. María Eloísa G. Parco-de Castro, 2nd ed. (Quezon City: Vibal Foundation, 2016), 293.
  3. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  4. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  5. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  6. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  7. Quirino, Old Manila, 292-3.
  8. Quirino, Old Manila, 293.
  9. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  10. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  11. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa;" Quirino, Old Manila, 292.
  12. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  13. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  14. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  15. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  16. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  17. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  18. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  19. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  20. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  21. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  22. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  23. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  24. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  25. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  26. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."
  27. Real Academia de la Historia, "Toribio José Miguel de Cossío y Campa."

Citation

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