Teodoro Locsin Jr.

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Teodoro "Teddy Boy" Lopez Locsin Jr. (born 15 November 1948) is a lawyer, politician, diplomat, and former journalist. He is currently the secretary of the Department of Foreign Affairs under the administration of President Rodrigo Duterte. Locsin was a representative of the 1st district of Makati from 2001 to 2010. From 2017 to 2018, he was the Philippine ambassador to the United Nations. He was the host of “Teditorial,” the editorial segment of The World Tonight, ANC’s nightly newscast.[1]

Early life and education

Teodoro “Teddy Boy” Lopez Locsin Jr. was born on 15 November 1948 in Manila. His father, Teodoro Locsin Sr., was a prominent publisher and journalist who hailed from Silay City, Negos Occidental. He earned his bachelor’s degree in law and jurisprudence from the Ateneo de Manila University and received a master’s degree in law from Harvard University.[2]

Supreme Court nominations

In 2009, the Judicial and Bar Council nominated Locsin to replace outgoing Senior Associate Justice Leonardo Quisumbing. He, however, did not get the position.[3] In 2012, he was nominated to succeed Renato Corona as chief justice.[4] Maria Lourdes Sereno was appointed to the position.

United Nations

Locsin became the country’s permanent representative to the United Nations in 2017 after accepting the designation from President Rodrigo Duterte in 2016. Under his leadership, the Philippines joined nine other nations in November 2017 in voting against a UN resolution that urged Myanmar to stop its military campaign against Rohingya Muslims in the state of Rakhine. [5] Furthermore, the country was also one of 35 nations at the UN General Assembly’s December 2017 emergency session that abstained on the UN vote to declare the US recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital null and void. [5] In March 2018, Locsin submitted the Philippines’ letter of withdrawal from the Rome Statute, the treaty that organized the International Criminal Court (ICC), following President Duterte’s expression of intention to end the country’s membership in the court.[5] Locsin resigned from the position of permanent representative of the country to the UN on 12 October 2018, when he was tasked to become the secretary of foreign affairs.

Foreign Affairs Secretary

Locsin (left) with US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in February 2019

Locsin succeeded Alan Peter Cayetano as secretary of the Department of Foreign Affairs in October 2018. Cayetano vacated the post in preparation for his candidacy for representative of Taguig City in the 2019 national elections.[6]

Personal life

Relationships

Locsin is married to Ma. Lourdes Barcelon. He was previously married to Vivian Yuchengco, former chairperson of the Philippine Stock Exchange. They have two daughters, Margarita and Bianca.

Career history

  • Secretary of Foreign Affairs (2018–present)
  • Philippine Ambassador to the United Nations (2017–2018)
  • Law Professor at San Beda University (2015–2017)
  • Host of #NoFilter on ANC (2016)
  • Radio anchor of DZRH Executive Session (2014– Present)
  • Segment anchor of The World Tonight's TEDitorial (2011–2017)
  • Former host of Assignment on ABS-CBN (1994–2003)
  • Publisher and editor-in-chief of Today Newspaper (1993–2005)
  • Executive director of Philippine Free Press magazine (1993–2013)
  • Publisher of The Daily Globe newspaper (1988–1993)
  • Presidential speechwriter of Office of the President (1985–1992)
  • Presidential spokesperson, legal counsel and speechwriter, office of Pres. Corazon Aquino of Ministry of Information, Malacañang (1986–1988)
  • Locsin was known as the speechwriter of Corazon Aquino, and penned her standing ovation speech at the US Congress (1986)
  • Lecturer of US War College (1991)
  • Press Secretary (1986–1987)
  • Executive assistant to the chairman of Ayala Corporation and Bank of the Philippine Islands (1982–1985)
  • Associate of Angara, Abello, Concepcion, Regala and Cruz Law offices (1977–1982)
  • Editorial writer of Philippine Free Press (1967–1972)

References