Pedro Antonio Salazar Castillo

From Wikipilipinas
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Pedro Antonio Salazar Castillo y Varona (19 February 1782 – 11 April 1861)[1] was the acting Governor-General of the Philippines from 9 September 1835 to 27 August 1837.[2]

Biography

Castillo was from Ibrillos, Spain.[3] He entered the Spanish Army on 26 March 1798.[4] After finishing his studies at the Royal Academy of Mathematics in Barcelona, he entered the Corps of Engineers on 29 December 1799.[5] He participated in various military campaigns, including those organized during the War of the Oranges (1801), and the Spanish War of Independence (1807–1814).[6] He even supported the efforts of Coalition forces to defeat Napoleon during the Battle of Waterloo.[7]

He was assigned in the Philippines in 1834, where he became the segundo cabo (commander of the army).[8] He eventually assumed the position of acting Governor-General, succeeding Juan Crámer.[9]

As Governor-General

He ordered on 25 April 1836 that the plain pesetas coined from Spain should be accepted in the archipelago at their value of four reals vellón instead of five, and that it should be circulated into the archipelago.[10] He prohibited on 28 July 1836 the natives from carrying gunpower and firearms, and selling them to those hostile to Spain, particularly the Moro pirates.[11]

He established commercial relations with the Sultanate of Sulu by signing a treaty with Sultan Mahamad Diamalud Kiram on 22 September 1836.[12] The treaty stipulated that "every three-mastered ship which made port at Jolo with Chinese passengers from Manila should pay 2,000 pesos fuertes, and smaller vessels in proportion to their size;" and that "the most important cargo which went from Manila to Jolo never exceeded 2,500 pesos. The Joloan barks which should go to Zamboanga were to pay a duty of one per cent, and those which entered at Manila two per cent; but no Joloan bark was accustomed to go to Manila."[13]

He sent an expedition in 1836 to occupy the Cordilleras, but because of inadequate preparations and the beginning of the rainy season, the costly expedition was stopped.[14] He also sent in the same year an expedition to eliminate the pirates from Masbate, which was successful.[15]

He requested on 26 January 1837 to the royal government that Spanish regular priests (priests who are members of religious orders) be sent to the archipelago to administer its parishes.[16] He also wanted to send two hundred regular priests who were affected by the secularization in Spain to the archipelago.[17] This is because he, like other Governors-General, saw the native secular clergy as unfit to serve as parish priests.[18]

Events during his term

It was during his term that the Royal Council of Spain and the Indies was abolished due to a royal decree in 1836.[19] It was also during his term that the representation of the Philippines in the Spanish Cortes was lost due to a new constitution in 1837.[20] This was the result of the provision that all provinces of Ultramar should be governed by special laws.[21]

Numerous royal orders were also made to be implemented in the archipelago. Such are the following: the compilation and publication of tables of the values of currencies in the new provinces in America through the royal order of 1 February 1836; and the declaration that the provinces of Caraga, Samar, Iloilo, Antique, Capiz, Albay, Camarines Sur, and Tayabas be under the administration of governors who are military officers appointed by the War Department through the royal order of 31 May 1837.[22]

After his term

His term as acting Governor-General ended on 27 August 1837 after the appointment of the new Governor-General, Andrés García Camba.[23] He returned to Spain in 1841, where he was promoted to mariscal de campo and appointed as adviser to the Consejo de Ultramar.[24] He was also given the Great Cross of the Order of Isabella the Catholic.[25]

References

  1. Real Academia de la Historia, "Pedro Antonio Salazar y Salazar," accessed 2 February 2021, http://dbe.rah.es/biografias/83196/pedro-antonio-salazar-y-salazar
  2. Carlos Quirino, Old Manila, ed. María Eloísa G. Parco-de Castro, 2nd ed. (Quezon City: Vibal Foundation, 2016), 295.
  3. Quirino, Old Manila, 295.
  4. Real Academia de la Historia, "Pedro Antonio Salazar y Salazar."
  5. Real Academia de la Historia, "Pedro Antonio Salazar y Salazar."
  6. Real Academia de la Historia, "Pedro Antonio Salazar y Salazar."
  7. Real Academia de la Historia, "Pedro Antonio Salazar y Salazar."
  8. Quirino, Old Manila, 295.
  9. José Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," in The Philippine Islands 1493-1898, trans. Emma Helen Blair and James Alexander Robertson, vol. 51 (Cleveland: The Arthur H. Clark Company, 1906), 60.
  10. Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," 60-1.
  11. Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," 61.
  12. Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," 61.
  13. Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," 61.
  14. Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," 62.
  15. Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," 62.
  16. Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," 62.
  17. Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," 62-3.
  18. Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," 62.
  19. Quirino, Old Manila, 295.
  20. Quirino, Old Manila, 295.
  21. Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," 65.
  22. Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," 64-5.
  23. Quirino, Old Manila, 295.
  24. Real Academia de la Historia, "Pedro Antonio Salazar y Salazar."
  25. Real Academia de la Historia, "Pedro Antonio Salazar y Salazar."

Citation

Wiki.png

Original content from WikiPilipinas. under GNU Free Documentation License. See full disclaimer.