Manuel Gonzalez de Aguilar

From Wikipilipinas
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Manuel González de Aguilar (18th century – 19th century)[1] was the Governor-General of the Philippines from 4 March 1810 to 4 September 1813.[2]

Biography

González de Aguilar was a knight of the Order of Santiago.[3]

He arrived in the Philippines on 4 March 1810 to assume the position of governor-general, replacing Rafael María de Aguilar.[4] Before his appointment, Mariano Fernández de Folgueras served as acting governor-general.

He created an ordinance concerning estancias (ranches) or communal lands where the natives would keep their herds of cattle and horses.[5] He proposed the abolition of the Manila-Acapulco Galleon Trade, which was eventually promulgated by his successor in 1813.[6] It was during his term that the natives were allowed to render the services required from them within their vicinity.[7]

During his term as governor-general, the Philippines and other colonies of Spain were granted representation in the Spanish Cortes by power of the royal decrees of 29 January and 14 February 1810.[8] During the first sessions of the Cortes, which began on 24 September 1810, the archipelago was represented by acting deputies.[9] Eventually, Ventura de los Reyes was duly chosen by Manila to represent the archipelago in the Cortes.[10] Some of the laws introduced by the Cortes which affected the archipelago were the following: the order on 26 January 1811 that trade in quicksilver should be free in all Spanish colonies and the order on 3 July 1813 that extended to veteran troops in colonies the same rewards as those that were given to veteran troops in Spain.[11] Also, the archipelago received the Cádíz Constitution of 1812, which served as a guide on how to resolve the problems caused by the galleon trade and the abuses on the natives.[12] The Constitution was solemnly proclaimed in Manila on 17 April 1813, and the oath of allegiance to the monarch was done on the following day.[13]

It was also during his term that the archipelago published its first newspaper on August 1811, the Del Superior Govierno, a periodical for Spaniards living in the archipelago.[14] This was published in order to relieve the anxiety and impatience of many from lack of news from Spain.[15]

It was also during his term that the Lung-ao Revolt broke out. The religious revolt, which broke out in the summer of 1811, was led by Paras Lampitoc of Laoag. He considered himself as the chief apostle of Lung-ao or the Redeemer.[16] Lampitoc promised deliverance from tributes, monopolies, and other impositions made by the Spaniards.[17] The instigators of the revolt tried to persuade the tribes from Cagayan to join them, but the Spaniards were able to quell the revolt and had its leaders executed.[18]

González de Aguilar left his position on 4 September 1813.[19] He was succeeded by José Ramón de Gardoqui.[20]

References

  1. Real Academia de la Historia, "Manuel González de Aguilar," accessed 3 February 2021, http://dbe.rah.es/biografias/54823/manuel-gonzalez-de-aguilar
  2. Carlos Quirino, Old Manila, ed. María Eloísa G. Parco-de Castro, 2nd ed. (Quezon City: Vibal Foundation, 2016), 295.
  3. Quirino, Old Manila, 295.
  4. Real Academia de la Historia, "Manuel González de Aguilar."
  5. José Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," in The Philippine Islands 1493-1898, trans. Emma Helen Blair and James Alexander Robertson, vol. 51 (Cleveland: The Arthur H. Clark Company, 1906), 31-2.
  6. Real Academia de la Historia, "Manuel González de Aguilar."
  7. Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," 32-3.
  8. Quirino, Old Manila, 295.
  9. Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," 31.
  10. Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," 31.
  11. Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," 33-4.
  12. Quirino, Old Manila, 295.
  13. Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," 33.
  14. Quirino, Old Manila, 295.
  15. Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," 33.
  16. The Basi Revolt by Esteban Villanueva (Manila: National Museum of the Philippines, 2020), 12, http://nationalmuseum.gov.ph/nationalmuseumbeta/img/NMP%20Publications%20-%20The%20Basi%20Revolt%20(September%202020).pdf; Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," 32.
  17. The Basi Revolt, 12.
  18. Montero y Vidal, "Events in Filipinas, 1801-1840," 32.
  19. Quirino, Old Manila, 295.
  20. Quirino, Old Manila, 295.

Citation

Wiki.png

Original content from WikiPilipinas. under GNU Free Documentation License. See full disclaimer.