Hernando Ocampo

From Wikipilipinas
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Hernando Ruiz Ocampo (28 April 1911- 28 December1978) was a pioneering self-taught Philippine modern artist. He was recognized as one of the National Artists of the Philippines in Visual Arts in 1991. He is known for his abstract works.

Personal background

Ocampo was born to Emilio Ocampo and Delfina Ruiz on 28 April 1911 in Santa Cruz, Manila.

Education

Ocampo studied law, commerce and creative writing. When it came to painting, he was self-taught.

Career

Before he got started in the visual arts, Ocampo was a writer. In 1931 he began working at Philippine Education Company in 1931. In 1935 he became the executive secretary of the National Paper Mills, Inc. He also worked on scripts for Palaris Feler and Fernando Poe Productions after the war.

He helped organize a group of young writers called the Veronicans. Among its distinguished members were Francisco Arcellana, Estrella Alfon, N.V.M. Gonzalez, Manuel Viray and Angel G. de Jesus. He won prizes for his fictional works “Bakya,” and “Rice and Bullets.” During the Japanese Occupation, he wrote stage plays and became the chief scriptwriter and assistant director of the Associated Artists. The Japanese appointed him as a censor for the stage and for the Taliba newspaper. At the same time, he became second lieutenant in Straughn’s Guerrillas. He also became editor for the Manila Chronicle's Sunday magazine, and a producer-director for the Filipino Players Guild from 1958 to 1968.

His career in the visual arts began in the 1950’s. He started exhibiting works both in the Philippines and in other countries, including in Washington, New York, Sao Paolo, and Tokyo.

Ocampo saw his artistic development as having different stages: his Amorsolo period (1929-1934), in which his style was influenced by painter Fernando Amorsolo; his proletarian period (1934-1945), in which he captured the realities of his time; his transitional period (1945-1963), in which his style grew more complex and stylized; his mutants period (1963-1968), in which his works were inspired by a science fiction film about strange forms mutated by nuclear explosions called The Beginning of the End; and his visual melody period (1968-1978), in which he developed his abstract style. Ocampo achieved prominence in the visual arts. He was a member of the Saturday Group of artists, and was one of the Thirteen Moderns. He, Vicente S. Manansala, and Cesar Legaspi formed the triumvirate of neo-realists.

Major Works

Achievements

  • 1948 – 6th Prize, Art Association of the Philippines, for Nude with Candle and Flower
  • 1949 – 3rd Prize, Manila Club Art Exhibition, for Angel’s Kiss
  • 1950 – 1st Prize, Art Association of the Philippines, for Arabesque
  • 1950 – 2nd Prize, Art Association of the Philippines, for Man and Carabao
  • 1951 – 1st Prize and Special Award, Art Association of the Philippines, for Ancestors
  • 1951 – Honorable Mention, Art Association of the Philippines, for Intramuros
  • 1954 – 3rd Prize, Art Association of the Philippines, for 53-E
  • 1965 – Republic Cultural Award
  • 1955 – Honorable Mention, Art Association of the Philippines, for 54-A
  • 1958 – 2nd Prize and Purchase Prize, Art Association of the Philippines, for Nativity
  • 1969 – 1st Prize, Art Association of the Philippines, for Circle
  • 1969 – Patnubay ng Sining at Kalinangan Award, from the City of Manila
  • 1976 – Diwa ng Lahi Award, from the City of Manila
  • 1979 – Gawad CCP para sa Sining Award, from the Cultural Center of the Philippines


References



Citation

Wiki.png

Original content from WikiPilipinas. under GNU Free Documentation License. See full disclaimer.