Tuwali

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Tuwali is one of the four ethnolinguistic groups inhabiting Ifugao.

Tuwali legends are two kinds, the ordinary and the mythological. Ordinary legends have no religious significance while the mythological ones are adaptations from sacred myths. In the absence of written accounts, legends and myths provide the only surviving means for the Ifugao of knowing about their past. They give insights to their forefathers' beliefs and ways , supply the rationale and reason for the institution of many of their present-day socio-religious practices.

Tuwali simple folk songs are classified as such because they are characteristically short, sung in simple melodies and convey very simple ideas. Ballads are formal songs and they almost always have a story line. The palat or satire are songs that satirize, make fun of, or ridicule a subject, his physical person, character o behavior. Adopted or borrowed words are commonly employed in palat compositions which enhance their satirizing and/or humorous effect. Both ballad and palat songs are sung in group during socio-ritual gatherings for general participation and entertainment.

Tuwali rhymes are perhaps the forerunners of the simple folk songs. While the purpose of the composition is to effect rhyming of words and sounds, many rhymes are crude and metrically irregular. Tuwali rhymes are usually short, and while some convey ideas others have incomplete or no sense at all.

As in some other cultural communities, Tuwali rhymes are composed for the entertainment and enjoyment of children. Old women, especially grandmothers, are mostly the composers of rhymes. Some bright children, too, can come up with two-or three-line rhymes but these lack polish.

The recitation of rhymes by old women and babysitters is to entertain young children, get their attention, make them behave or keep them from doing mischief. The verbal ability of children in parroting or composing rhymes has a great carry-over value in the art of lead-singing and lead-chanting during their adulthood.



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