Balut

From Wikipilipinas: The Hip 'n Free Philippine Encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
A partially peeled balut
Balut
Dissected Balut, showing the head part of the duckling.

Balut is a boiled, fertilized duck egg with an undeveloped embryo, usually eaten with salt. It is considered a delicacy in Asia, especially in the Philippines, where it is popularly believed to be an aphrodisiac and considered a high-protein, hearty snack.

Contents

History

Balut-making is not native to the Philippines. A similar preparation is known in China as maodan, and Chinese traders and migrants are said to have brought the idea of eating fertilized duck eggs to the Philippines. However, the knowledge and craft of balut-making has been localized by the balut-makers (mangbabalut). Today, balut production has not been mechanized in favor of the traditional production by hand. Although balut are produced throughout the Philippines, balut-makers in Pateros are renowned for their careful selection and incubation of the eggs.

Preparation

Fertilized duck eggs are kept warm in the sun and stored in baskets to retain warmth. After nine days, the eggs are held to a light to reveal the embryo inside. Approximately eight days later the balut are ready to be cooked, sold, and eaten. Vendors sell cooked balut out of buckets of sand, used to retain warmth, and are accompanied by small packets of salt. Uncooked balut are rarely sold in Southeast Asia. In the United States, many Asian markets occasionally carry uncooked balut eggs, though their demand in North America is not very great. The cooking process is identical to that of hard-boiled chicken eggs, and baluts are enjoyed while still warm.

Duck eggs that are not properly developed after nine to twelve days are sold as penoy, which look, smell and taste similar to a regular hard-boiled egg. In Filipino cuisine, these are occasionally beaten and fried, similar to scrambled eggs, and served with a vinegar dip.

The age of the egg before it can be cooked is a matter of local preference. In the Philippines, the perfect balut is 17 days old, at which point it is said to be balut sa puti ("wrapped in white"). The chick inside is not old enough to show its beak, feathers or claws and the bones are undeveloped. The Vietnamese prefer their balut matured from 19 days up to 21 days, when the chick is old enough to be recognizable as a baby duck and has bones that will be firm but tender when cooked.

Distribution

Balut is mostly sold by street vendors at night in the regions where they are available. Regarded as an "exotic" food, baluts are often served as side dishes or appetizers in drinking (liquor) sessions. The Filipino and Malay word balut(balot) roughly translates to mean "wrapped".

When sold, baluts are mostly wrapped in cloth and nestled in a basket. They are most often eaten with a pinch of salt, while others prefer chili and vinegar to complement their egg. The broth or 'juice' surrounding the embryo is sipped from the egg before the shell is peeled and the yolk and young chick inside can be eaten. All of the contents of the egg are consumed. Although considered a street food, baluts have recently entered higher cuisine by being served as appetizers in restaurants: cooked adobo style, fried in omelettes or even used as filling in baked pastries.


Duck eggs that are not properly developed after nine to twelve days are sold as penoy, which look, smell and taste similar to a regular hard-boiled egg. In Filipino cuisine, these are occasionally beaten and fried, similar to scrambled eggs, and served with a vinegar dip.

The age of the egg before it can be cooked is a matter of local preference. In the Philippines, the perfect balut is 17 days old, at which point it is said to be balut sa puti ("wrapped in white"). The chick inside is not old enough to show its beak, feathers or claws and the bones are undeveloped. The Vietnamese prefer their balut matured from 19 days up to 21 days, when the chick is old enough to be recognizable as a baby duck and has bones that will be firm but tender when cooked.

Trivia

Balut is also the name of a Danish Dice game played by expatriates in many countries all over the world. The name of the game has been taken from Balut eggs. Games are organized monthly by IBF (International Balut Federation) members.


References


External links


Citation

Wikipinas.png

Original content from WikiPilipinas. under GNU Free Documentation License. See full disclaimer.