2000 Pacific typhoon season

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2000 Pacific typhoon season
First storm formed: May 4, 2000

(May 3, 2000 JTWC)

Last storm dissipated: January 4, 2001

(January 5, 2001 JTWC)

Strongest storm: Bilis - 125 mph (205 km/h)

[Damrey - 180 mph (285 km/h) JTWC]

Total storms: 23 (26 JTWC)
Typhoons: 13 (15 JTWC)
Super typhoons: 5
Total fatalities: 624
Pacific typhoon seasons
1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

The 2000 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 2000, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November.<ref>http://www.typhoon2000.ph/garyp_mgtcs/may03sum.txt</ref> These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 2000 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin are assigned a name by the Tokyo Typhoon Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names.

Contents

Storms

Typhoon Damrey (Asiang)

Typhoon Damrey (Asiang)
Super Typhoon 01W
5
Typhoon Damrey 09 may 2000 0530Z.jpg Damrey 2000 track.png
Duration May 5May 12
Intensity 90 kts (10-min), 930 hPa

Typhoon Damrey, which formed on May 3, rapidly intensified on the 8th and 9th to a 180 mph super typhoon with a minimum central pressure of 878 millibars. It continued to the northeast, and vertical shear caused it to dissipate on the 12th. Damrey was the strongest typhoon of the season, and the strongest May typhoon since Typhoon Phyllis in 1958. It had no effect on any populated areas.

Tropical Storm Longwang (Biring)

Tropical Storm Longwang (Biring)
Tropical Storm 02W
TS
Tropical Storm Longwang 19 may 2000 0220Z.jpg Longwang 2000 track.png
Duration May 17May 20
Intensity 45 kts (10-min), 992 hPa

Tropical Depression Konsing

Tropical Depression Konsing
Tropical Depression 03W
TD
TD Konsing 03W 21 may 2000 0031Z.jpg 3-W 2000 track.png
Duration May 20May 22
Intensity 30 kts (10-min), 1002 hPa

Tropical Depression 04W

Tropical Depression 04W TD
TD 04W 31 may 2000 2331Z.jpg 4-W 2000 track.png
Duration May 30June 1
Intensity 30 kts (1-min), Unknown

Tropical Depression

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Tropical Depression TD
HKTD 18 jun 2000 1529Z.jpg
Duration June 18June 18
Intensity 30 kts (1-min), 1000 hPa

A vortex in an active trough over the South China Sea developed into a midget tropical depression on June 18, 35 km south-southwest of Hong Kong. It moved northward and made landfall that day, with its very small circulation being well captured by the Observatory's network of automatic weather stations. The depression brought light rain to Hong Kong and moderate winds. Although this tropical depression was widely recognised by Asian agencies, there are still disputes on the nature of this system. It had an unusually small size and formed surprisingly close to land.

Using the pressure-wind relation for midget tropical cyclones proposed by JTWC, the system had a 1-minute maximum sustained winds of about 90 km/h, equivalent to a tropical storm.

Typhoon Kirogi (Ditang)

Typhoon Kirogi (Ditang)
Typhoon 05W
4
Typhoon Kirogi 05 july 2000 0732Z.jpg Kirogi 2000 track.png
Duration July 2July 8
Intensity 90 kts (10-min), 940 hPa

Typhoon Kai-Tak (Edeng)

Typhoon Kai-Tak (Edeng)
Typhoon 06W
1
Typhoon Kai-Tak 07 july 2000 0305Z.jpg Kai-Tak 2000 track.png
Duration July 3July 11
Intensity 75 kts (10-min), 960 hPa

A tropical depression that developed on July 3 in the South China Sea drifted northward, becoming a storm on the 5th and a typhoon on the 6th. Kai-Tak continued northward, hitting Taiwan on the 9th. Kai-Tak dissipated on the 11th over the Yellow Sea, after causing torrential flooding resulting in 188 fatalities. It was named after Hong Kong's old international airport, Kai Tak Airport.

Tropical Depression Gloring

Tropical Depression Gloring
Tropical Depression 07W
TD
TD Gloring 07W 13 july 2000 0230Z.jpg 7-W 2000 track.png
Duration July 11July 15
Intensity 30 kts (10-min), 1000 hPa

Tropical Depression 08W

Tropical Depression 08W TD
TD 08W 17 july 2000 0642Z.jpg 8-W 2000 track.png
Duration July 16July 17
Intensity 30 kts (10-min), 996 hPa

Tropical Storm Tembin

Tropical Storm Tembin
Tropical Storm 09W
TS
TS Tembin 19 july 2000 0732Z.jpg Tembin 2000 track.png
Duration July 17July 23
Intensity 40 kts (10-min), 992 hPa

Severe Tropical Storm Bolaven (Huaning)

Severe Tropical Storm Bolaven (Huaning)
Tropical Depression 10W
Tropical Storm 11W
TS
STS Bolaven 29 july 2000 0225Z.jpg Bolaven 2000 track.png
Duration July 20July 31
Intensity 55 kts (10-min), 980 hPa

Tropical Storm Chanchu

Tropical Storm Chanchu
Tropical Storm Upana
Tropical Storm 12W
TS
TS Chanchu 28 july 2000 2132Z.jpg Chanchu 2000 track.png
Duration July 20July 30
Intensity 35 kts (10-min), 994 hPa

A tropical wave organized into Tropical Depression One-C on July 20. It strengthened slowly and moved nearly due west. After reaching storm strength on July 21, it was named Upana, which is Hawaiian for "Urban". Despite a favourable environment, Upana never strengthened much, and it dissipated on July 23 for unexplained reasons. Upana's remnants continued moving to the west, and crossed the dateline. Upana is the first storm in the Central Pacific Hurricane Center's area of responsibility to be named in July.

The remnants of Upana encountered a favourable environment just west of the dateline, and they formed Tropical Depression 12W. The depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Chanchu. The name Chanchu, submitted by Macao, is a Chinese word for pearl. Chanchu moved north, and had dissipated by July 30.

There is good evidence Chanchu is actually a regeneration of Upana. The official policy is that dateline crossers keep their name. However, there was supposedly some doubt at the time. Also, since Upana had dissipated several days earlier, the Japan Meteorological Agency decided that renaming the cyclone was the best choice.[1]

Typhoon Jelawat

Typhoon Jelawat
Super Typhoon 13W
4
Typhoon Jelawat 03 aug 2000 0632Z.jpg Jelawat 2000 track.png
Duration August 1August 11
Intensity 85 kts (10-min), 940 hPa

Tropical Depression 14W

Tropical Depression 14W TS
TD 14W 08 aug 2000 2131Z.jpg 14-W 2000 track.png
Duration August 8August 10
Intensity 30 kts (10-min), 1008 hPa

Typhoon Ewiniar

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Typhoon Ewiniar
Typhoon 15W
1
Typhoon Ewiniar 15 aug 2000 0632Z.jpg Ewiniar 2000 track.png
Duration August 9August 19
Intensity 70 kts (10-min), 965 hPa

Tropical Storm Wene

Tropical Storm Wene
Tropical Depression 16W
TS
TS Wene 16 aug 2000.jpg Wene 2000 track.png
Duration August 15August 17
Intensity 45 kts (1-min), 1002 hPa

Tropical Depression 17W

Tropical Depression 17W TD
TD 17W 18 aug 2000 0351Z.jpg 17-W 2000 track.png
Duration August 17August 19
Intensity 25 kts (1-min), Unknown

Typhoon Bilis (Isang)

Typhoon Bilis (Isang)
Super Typhoon 18W
5
Typhoon Bilis 22 aug 2000 0832Z.jpg Bilis 2000 track.png
Duration August 18August 24
Intensity 110 kts (10-min), 915 hPa

On August 17, a tropical depression began its life in the Philippine Sea. It tracked northwestward, becoming a tropical storm on the 18th and a typhoon on the 19th. Bilis continued to intensify to a super typhoon on the 21st, and it struck the southeastern coast of Taiwan on the 22nd. It weakened slightly to a 140 mph typhoon while crossing the country, and hit China on the 23rd. Bilis was responsible for 17 deaths and $133.5 million in damage on Taiwan.

Tropical Depression

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Tropical Depression TD
Tropical Depression 20 aug 2000 0145Z.jpg
Duration August 19August 20
Intensity 30 kts (10-min), 1000 hPa

Tropical Storm Kaemi

Tropical Storm Kaemi
Tropical Storm 19W
TS
TS Kaemi 22 aug 2000 0337Z.jpg Kaemi 2000 track.png
Duration August 20August 23
Intensity 45 kts (10-min), 985 hPa

Typhoon Prapiroon (Lusing)

Typhoon Prapiroon (Lusing)
Typhoon 20W
1
Typhoon Prapiroon 30 aug 2000 0225Z.jpg Prapiroon 2000 track.png
Duration August 25September 1
Intensity 70 kts (10-min), 965 hPa

Tropical Storm Maria

Tropical Storm Maria
Tropical Storm 21W
TS
TS Maria 31 aug 2000 0310Z.jpg Maria 2000 track.png
Duration August 28September 1
Intensity 40 kts (10-min), 985 hPa

Typhoon Saomai (Osang)

Typhoon Saomai (Osang)
Super Typhoon 22W
5
Typhoon Saomai 10 sept 2000 2250Z.jpg Saomai 2000 track.png
Duration September 2September 18
Intensity 100 kts (10-min), 925 hPa

Typhoon Wukong (Maring)

Typhoon Wukong (Maring)
Typhoon 23W
2
Typhoon Wukong 09 sept 2000 0248Z.jpg Wukong 2000 track.png
Duration September 2September 10
Intensity 75 kts (10-min), 955 hPa

Severe Tropical Storm Bopha (Ningning)

Severe Tropical Storm Bopha (Ningning)
Tropical Storm 24W
TS
STS Bopha 08 sept 2000 0220Z.jpg Bopha 2000 track.png
Duration September 5September 12
Intensity 50 kts (10-min), 985 hPa

Tropical Storm

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Tropical Storm TS
Tropical Storm 15 sept 2000 0045Z.jpg
Duration September 13September 18
Intensity 45 kts (1-min), Unknown

Severe Tropical Storm Sonamu

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Severe Tropical Storm Sonamu
Tropical Storm 25W
1
STS Sonamu 16 sept 2000 0130Z.jpg Sonami 2000 track.png
Duration September 14September 21
Intensity 55 kts (10-min), 975 hPa

Typhoon Shanshan

Typhoon Shanshan
Super Typhoon 26W
4
Typhoon Shanshan 22 sept 2000 0425Z.jpg Shanshan 2000 track.png
Duration September 17September 27
Intensity 95 kts (10-min), 930 hPa

Tropical Storm 27W

Tropical Storm 27W TD
Tropical Storm 27W 28 sept 2000 2031Z.jpg 27-W 2000 track.png
Duration September 28September 30
Intensity 30 kts (10-min), 1008 hPa

Tropical Storm 28W

Tropical Storm 28W TS
TS 28W 13 oct 2000 0034Z.jpg 28-W 2000 track.png
Duration October 6October 14
Intensity 30 kts (10-min), 998 hPa

Tropical Storm

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Tropical Storm TS
Tropical Storm 18 oct 2000 0130Z.jpg
Duration October 15October 19
Intensity 40 kts (1-min), Unknown

Typhoon Yagi (Paring)

Typhoon Yagi (Paring)
Typhoon 29W
3
Typhoon Yagi 25 oct 2000 0038Z.jpg Yagi 2000 track.png
Duration October 21October 28
Intensity 65 kts (10-min), 975 hPa

Typhoon Xangsane (Reming)

Typhoon Xangsane (Reming)
Typhoon 30W
2
Typhoon Xangsane 31 oct 2000 0732Z.jpg Xangsane 2000 track.png
Duration October 25November 2
Intensity 75 kts (10-min), 960 hPa

On October 27, Typhoon Xangsane hit southern Luzon of the Philippines. It turned to the north over the South China Sea, and after strengthening to a 100 mph typhoon it hit Taiwan. Xangsane dissipated on the 1st, after causing 181 casualties, 83 of which came from an airplane crash on October 31.

Typhoon Bebinca (Seniang)

Typhoon Bebinca (Seniang)
Typhoon 31W
2
Typhoon Bebinca 03 nov 2000 0310Z.jpg Bebinca 2000 track.png
Duration October 31November 8
Intensity 70 kts (10-min), 960 hPa

On November 2, Tropical Storm Bebinca hit the central Philippines. It strengthened to a typhoon and reached a peak of 95 mph winds while crossing the archipelago, due to the contraction of the wind field. Bebinca continued northwestward, eventually dissipating over the South China Sea on the 8th after killing 26 people.

Tropical Storm 32W

Tropical Storm 32W TD
TS 32W 09 nov 2000 0230Z.jpg 32-W 2000 track.png
Duration November 8November 9
Intensity 30 kts (10-min), 1004 hPa

Severe Tropical Storm Rumbia (Toyang)

Severe Tropical Storm Rumbia (Toyang)
Tropical Storm 33W
TS
STS Rumbia 29 nov 2000 0210Z.jpg Rumbia 2000 track.png
Duration November 27December 8
Intensity 55 kts (10-min), 985 hPa

Tropical Depression Ulpiang

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Tropical Depression Ulpiang TD
TD Ulpiang 06 dec 2000 0215Z.jpg
Duration December 6December 8
Intensity 30 kts (10-min), 1003 hPa

Typhoon Soulik (Welpring)

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Typhoon Soulik (Welpring)
Typhoon 34W
4
Typhoon Soulik 03 jan 2001 0632Z.jpg Soulik 2000 track.png
Duration December 28January 5
Intensity 80 kts (10-min), 945 hPa

Storm names

Western North Pacific tropical cyclones were now named by the RSMC Tokyo-Typhoon Center of the Japan Meteorological Agency. Previous typhoon season names were assigned by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Names are now selected from the following lists, there is no annual list. Names are selected from the following lists, there is no annual list. Names were contributed by 13 members of the ESCAP/WMO Typhoon Committee, except for Singapore. The 13 nations or territories, along with Micronesia, each submitted 10 names, which are used in alphabetical order by the English name of the country. The first storm of 2000 was named Damrey and the final one was named Soulik.

Contributing Nation Names
Cambodia Damrey 01W
Kong-rey
Nakri
Krovanh
Sarika
China Longwang 02W
Yutu
Fengshen
Dujuan
Haima
DPR Korea Kirogi 05W
Toraji
Kalmaegi
Maemi
Meari
Hong Kong Kai-Tak 06W
Man-yi
Fung-wong
Choi-wan
Ma-on
Japan Tembin 09W
Usagi
Kammuri
Koppu
Tokage
Laos Bolaven 11W
Pabuk
Phanfone
Ketsana
Nock-ten
Macau Chanchu 12W
Wutip
Vongfong
Parma
Muifa
Malaysia Jelawat 13W
Sepat
Rusa
Melor
Merbok
Micronesia Ewiniar 15W
Fitow
Sinlaku
Nepartak
Nanmadol
Philippines Bilis 18W
Danas
Hagupit
Lupit
Talas
RO Korea Kaemi 19W
Nari
Changmi
Sudal
Noru
Thailand Prapiroon 20W
Vipa
Mekkhala
Nida
Kulap
U.S.A. Maria 21W
Francisco
Higos
Omais
Roke
Vietnam Saomai 22W
Lekima
Bavi
Conson
Sonca
Cambodia Bopha 24W
Krosa
Maysak
Chanthu
Nesat
China Wukong 23W
Haiyan
Haishen
Dianmu
Haitang
DPR Korea Sonamu 25W
Podul
Pongsona
Mindule
Nalgae
Hong Kong Shanshan 26W
Lingling
Yanyan
Tingting
Banyan
Japan Yagi 29W
Kajiki
Kujira
Kompasu
Washi
Laos Xangsane 30W
Faxai
Chan-hom
Namtheun
Matsa
Macau Bebinca 31W
Vamei
Linfa
Malou
Sanvu
Malaysia Rumbia 33W
Tapah
Nangka
Meranti
Mawar
Micronesia Soulik 34W
Mitag
Soudelor
Rananin
Guchol
Philippines
Cimaron
Hagibis
Imbudo
Malakas
Talim
RO Korea
Chebi
Noguri
Koni
Megi
Nabi
Thailand
Durian
Rammasun
Morakot
Chaba
Khanun
U.S.A.
Utor
Chataan
Etau
Aere
Vicente
Vietnam
Trami
Halong
Vamco
Songda
Saola

Philippines

The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) uses its own naming scheme for tropical cyclones within its area of responsibility. Lists are recycled every four years. This is the same list used for the 1996 season.

  • Asiang 01W
  • Biring 02W
  • Konsing 03W
  • Ditang 05W
  • Edeng 06W
  • Gloring 07W
  • Huaning 11W
  • Isang 18W
  • Lusing 20W
  • Maring 23W
  • Ningning 24W
  • Osang 22W
  • Paring 29W
  • Reming 30W
  • Seniang 31W
  • Toyang (unused)
  • Ulpiang (unused)
  • Welpring (unused)
  • Yerling (unused)
  • Aring (unused)
  • Basiang (unused)
  • Kayang (unused)
  • Dorang (unused)
  • Enang (unused)
  • Grasing (unused)

References

<references/>

See also

External links

Original Source

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